Whetu Fala – Interviews

Whetu Fala interviews and presenter roles as herself.

Te Ao Māori News July 2019

Tangata Pasifika 1993 Part three 1’16”

Ask Your Auntie 2007

Ngā Aho Whakaari – Māori Screen Guild Fale Matariki 2013

Whakaata Māori – Matariki Awards 2016

Stand up Aōtearoa

Run it straightHone Harawira has sent out the Rubeun Taipari organised protest march schedule on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) signing by twelve nation heads, set for Sky City on 4th February in Tamaki, Auckland.

The openly public schedule also announces at the conclusion of TPPA march in Auckland all involved are invited to travel to Waitangi and Te Tii  Marae.

Here the people will once more take the John Key led National government to task over the TPPA signing without a referendum or consultation with all the people of Aōtearoa.

The easily accessed and heralded anti-TPPA protest plans for Auckland and Waitangi are in contrast to what the government would have us believe. Two days ago the government sent police to visit known anti-TPPA activist Scout Barbour-Evans in Dunedin to ask what they had planned for the upcoming TPPA protests. A simple Google search on relevant websites gives TPPA protest plans the length and breath of Aōtearoa.

Ngāti Whātua ki Orākei this week publicly announced that as part of their opposition to the signing of TPPA they would refuse to traditionally welcome any of the expected TPPA heads into Auckland.

And who could blame them as although their claim with the crown is settled, Ngāti Whātua Orākei know first hand what trauma visiting dignitaries  can create.

 In 1951 in preparation for a visit of Queen Elizabeth II the New Zealand government wrongfully evicted them and burnt down their homes as it was claimed their village was an eyesore and would not be suitable for the Queen to see as she drove past their pā in Okahu Bay.

Joe  recalls the eviction in 1951 from their home vividly when as an eight year old boy, he and his Dad were in the orchards above the village and saw clouds of smoke coming from their village. They ran back, only to discover all of the village being burnt down by men with flame-throwers and his younger siblings with his mum and elders weeping with what few possessions they had managed to carry out of their homes, at their feet.

In 1977 as a family man and leader of the peaceful 506 day occupation of resistance to the crown proposal to build housing developments on the same land Joe Hawke also remembers the day when the Muldoon led National government sent tanks and soldiers to evict him and his extended family again.

People who stand up for what they believe in against the status quo pay a price and for Joe Hawke and Ngāti Whātua Orākei who now live and are returning to live on their ancestral land in 2015 – it was worth it.

This week saw two very different native filmmaking teams who stood up and self-financed films.

Tangata whenua woman director, Tere Harrison from Te Whānau-a-Apanui is Writer/Director/Producer of the short film “Run it Straight.” A plea on behalf of West Papua people it attests that West Papua people are being subjugated to murder, torture for the sake of gold that is on their lands.

Harrison creates a visual mash up, liberally using dashes of stylised poetry sequences, poly swagg-esque elements, short drama, rugby league sports teams camaraderie to highlight the plight of West Papua.

Along the way, she confronts Māori prejudices against ‘FOB’s’ (Fresh off the boat people) and ‘Islanders’ as ‘other’ and also challenges the notion that rugby league players and politics will never mix.

Harrison blends in real life cameos from West Papua leaders and includes Māori leaders Dr Maria Bargh, Hone Harawira, Glenis Phillip Babara and many more. Yes, tragically, the harsh reality of the torture of West Papua people although handled sensitively is still shocking to see here.

“Run it straight” had its cast and crew screening at Te Upoko o te Ika Māori radio station and will be making its way into the world very shortly.

In the words of wāhine toa director Tere Harrison This short film Run It Straight was inspired by a protest I saw by the Hunters Rugby League Club Wellington who marched to the Indonesian Embassy to call for the freedom of West Papua…….It’s time to learn the story about the people of West Papua, it’s time to Run It Straight for West Papua.”

Last night I attended an advertised by Facebook one-off only screening at Queensgate, Lower Hutt of “3 Wise Cousins” a full length feature film written, directed and co-produced by Samoan director, SQS aka Stallone Vaiaoga-Ioasa .

Stallone and his team launched the feature in December 2015 at a one -off screening in the Civic theatre in Auckland saying they were going to try and screen the film during the school holidays and they managed to do just that and had screenings in Wellington, Christchurch and Auckland with one catch – you had to be in the know!

A heart-felt comedy with a moral it was shot mainly on location in Samoa, it follows the trials of love-struck unemployed, play station playing Adam (Neil Amituanai)  from Auckland, adult but still living at home only spoilt child.

Adam invites himself to Samoa and into the lives of his two cousins Moses (Vito Vito) and Tavita (Fesuai Viliamu) and begs them to teach him ‘How to be a real Island guy’ in order to win the affections of a neighbourhood girl (Gloria Blake) whom he has never met but fancies and bus stalked.

His two cousins good-naturedly agree and set out to help their love luckless cousin become a real Samoan. All three get more out of the experience than they all bargain for.

I was lucky to get the ‘3 Wise Cousins’ ticket as they were nearly full and arrived to find a second screening had been put on due to demand. It was a packed house and I did not see one palagi (Pākeha – white) person in the audience.

The average audience age was around twelve years old and they all seemed to be out with their parents and older teenage siblings. A predominately Samoan speaking audience, the theatre laughed and cheered at all the Samoan language and culture jokes. At the end many stayed in their seats afterwards excitedly talking about what they had seen.

Director Stallone Vaiaoga-Ioasa ” I think people will definitely leave with a bit more wisdom, I think this film will be quite eye opening for a lot of people. They’ll find that amongst the laughter there’s just a lot more, I guess perspective. They’ll definitely walk away with perspective”

 

Sources

Ngāti Whātua Orakei

Waitangi Tribunal

Free West Papua Aōtearoa

Free West Papua Campaign

Peace Movement Aōtearoa

Stuff – TPPA Visits

Run it Straight 

Three Wise cousins

http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/MatikeMaiAotearoaReport.pdf

Golden Globe or not – Stop TPPA & Honour the Treaty

2016 Golden Globes“I want to share this award with all the First Nations represented in this film and all the indigenous communities around the world, it is time we recognised your history and we protect your indigenous lands from corporate interests and people that are out there to exploit them…..” 

2016 Best Actor Golden Globe winner Leonardo diCaprio for the movie The Revenant.

Kia ora Mr DiCaprio, we accept!

Can’t wait to see y/our Golden Globe housed on our marae, some time soon. I know,  I know, it could take some years to work its way thru all of the nations of Turtle Island, home crowd first and all that, but maybe we could ask Sir Richard at Weta Workshop (Oscar winning local) to knock us up a replica while y/our real Golden Globe is making its tiki tour to these shores?

My Screen Natives movie review of  The Revenant can be seen here.

While First Nations the world over basked in the nano second of sudden online fame of being feted by one of the worlds leading movie actors, and ‘winning’ a Golden Globe,  our reverie was cut short by the ‘Oscars no natives’ story and the planned boycotting of the 2016 Oscar ceremony.

Aue!  Just when that nice Mr DiCaprio was planning on taking us with him – the whole bro’town –  to reflected First Nations Oscar victory, a boycott had to come along and ruin it. Taiho! Haven’t we already seen a spectacular Oscar boycott ? And just what the hell is a revenant and what does revenant mean?

Revenant: Noun 1.  a person who returns. 2. a person who returns as a spirit after death; ghost. Word origin, French revenir

Stranger than fiction but true nonetheless;

Going up 1973.png

  • in 1973 at the Oscars ceremony in front of millions of viewers,  Sacheen Littlefeather (see above) President of the National Native American Affirmative Committee refused the Oscar on behalf of Marlon Brando who had boycotted the Oscars ceremony in protest at the representation of Native Americans in film and television and to support a Native struggle at Wounded Knee.HTT
  • 2016 Māori are actively opposed to the signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) on the grounds that it is likely to take away our intellectual rights present and past, and relies upon the good will of the government to take into account the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi obligations to Māori.

But there ends the analogy to being REVENANT for; Māori never left Aōtearoa and despite everything that has been inflicted upon us, we are not ‘returning’ or even ghosts in our land but very much alive and fighting. The flaws in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement are real and do jeopardise Māori rights under the Treaty of Waitangi.

Cheers Mr Leo DiCaprio for supporting us and bringing our plight as First Nations people into the world media consciousness for a precious heartbeat.

We wish that it could be so –  but our over 170 year fight for sovereignty of lands, language, culture against all those who would exploit them for profit – is not so easily fixed with winning a Golden Globe.

Stop the signing of TPPA and Honour the Treaty of Waitangi.

Sources

Expert Paper #3
MĀORI RIGHTS, TE TIRITI O WAITANGI AND THE
TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT

Dr. Carwyn Jones, Associate Professor Claire Charters, Andrew Erueti, Professor Jane Kelsey

https://tpplegal.files.wordpress.com/2015/12/ep3-tiriti-paper.pdf

https://tpplegal.files.wordpress.com/2015/12/ep3-tiriti-paper.pdf

 

Leonardo diCaprio 2016 Golden Globes Winning Speech

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncgFQAISaGo

Leonardo DiCaprio savages corporate greed of big oil: ‘Enough is enough’

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jan/20/leonardi-dicaprio-savages-corporate-greed–big-oil-enough-is-enough
Dr Hirini Kaa
http://thespinoff.co.nz/22-01-2016/dear-mike-hosking-i-saw-your-waitangi-rant-and-i-can-help/

Ratana, TPPA, Māori women politicians

In February the signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) free trade deal will take place in Aōtearoa. The Ratana celebrations on 25th January could provide a catalyst to overturn the signing of TPPA. That would be a miracle worthy of the Ratana heritage.

Founder T.W. Ratana who died in 1939 was a Māori prophet, leader, healer and visionary. Known in the early 20th century as ‘the Māori miracle man’ he asked for Māori to believe in things that had never occurred before and the people flocked to him.

His influence on Māori politics and politicians is such that the Ratana movement continues to this day. Each year on 25th January at Ratana pa (village) his adherents the Morehu celebrate his birthday with services, sports tournaments and the like. And each year NZ politicians travel to Ratana to see and be seen by Māori voters.

The Ratana movement is more than just a Māori form of western religion started by a charismatic leader. Over the years, from the early 1920’s it has been a lightning rod for Māori aspirations and they have never lost sight of pursuit of the honouring of the Treaty of Waitangi.

In 1975 Ratana village hosted the Māori Land March, in 2006 the Ratana movement (see Ratana flag pictured at NZ parliament) marched against the Foreshore and Seabed legislation of the Labour led government.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement signing is another such critical moment that the Māori nation face, not the least because Waitangi Tribunal claimants against the signing

‘..allege that the Crown has breached the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi and that prejudice will result….’ Wai 2522

but as clearly articulated after the reading of the full TPPA terms by Māori lawyers and leaders such as Moana Jackson they attest, that TPPA will advantage non-elected corporations to make profits without the constraints of democratically elected governments. Furthermore, TPPA opponents say

‘Maori will lose intellectual property rights;…..Settlement of grievances will be prejudiced (past and future); Wai 2522

The Trans-Pacific partnership agreement is modern day piracy on a world-wide scale and divine intervention is called for to halt its signing.

We may all be skeptical that a political miracle like this could ever happen at Ratana in 2016, however T. W. Ratana in his own age challenged the status quo not just in Māori hierarchies and spirituality matters but also the NZ government. In 1924, he travelled to England to attempt to petition the English King for the Treaty of Waitangi to be honoured.

The Ratana movement has also been integral to Māori women entering NZ parliament.

In 1893 Māori got the vote unlike English women who had to wage a long and sustained militant civil disobedience war on their own government until achieving universal voting rights in 1919. See my Screen Natives movie review of the movie ‘Suffragette’ here.

Although Māori got the vote in 1893, we had to wait until 1949 for Iriaka Matiu Ratana to be the first Māori native woman to enter NZ parliament. She stood for Western Māori seat after her husband Matiu Ratana, the incumbent died suddenly. Iriaka held the seat for twenty years, despite being a solo parent to seven children and running a dairy farm.

In 1972 Whetu Tirakatene Sullivan became the first Māori woman Cabinet Minister and she was endorsed & groomed for politics by the Ratana movement and in particular, her father, Eruera Tirakatene, a Ratana stalwart and the first Ratana holder of the Southern Māori seat.

The brilliant Sandra Lee who in 1993 became the first Māori woman to win a general seat. does not have any obvious links to Ratana Pa or whanau, however, a Ratana link exists nevertheless. The late great Matiu Rata mentor of Lee and of course the 1979 founder of the Mana Motuhake Party had been a Ratana Youth leader.

In 2004 outstanding political leader Dame Tariana Turia founded and was co-leader of the Māori party. Raised in Whangaehu near Ratana, in her formative years she witnessed firsthand the results of the political work of Iriaka Ratana and Whetu Tirakatene – Sullivan on her village and at Ratana.

Politicians of all persuasions always appear at Ratana 25th celebrations. This is their photo opportunity with Māori en masse a kind of ‘cuzzie up’ before Waitangi Day in February.

An eleventh hour stand at Ratana by all Māori politicians against TPPA to overturn the signing of the agreement in February is still possible.

Now that would be a miracle worth witnessing.

 

Sources

Te Haahi Ratana

http://www.theratanachurch.org.nz/worldtour.html

Waitangi Tribunal

Wai 2522, Wai 2523, Wai 2530, Wai 2531, Wai 2532 CONCERNING the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975 AND applications for urgent hearings concerning the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement by the claimants for the Wai 2522,2523,2530,2531 and 2532 claims.

Nga Kahui Pou: Launching Maori Futures by Mason Durie, Huia Books 2004

Crossing the Floor – The Story of Tariana Turia by Helen Leahy Huia Books November 2015

Dorothy Page “The Suffragists: Women worked for the vote” Essays from the Dictionary of NZ Biography : Bridget Williams Books/Dept of Internal Affairs, Wellington: 1993

‘ Iriaka Rātana ‘, URL: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/people/iriaka-ratana, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage),

Angela Ballara. ‘Ratana, Iriaka Matiu’, from the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 14-Jan-2014
URL: http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/biographies/5r7/ratana-iriaka-matiu

Angela Ballara. ‘Tirikatene, Eruera Tihema Te Aika’, from the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 12-Mar-2014
URL: http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/biographies/4t18/tirikatene-eruera-tihema-te-aika

Moana Jackson and the Force of 10

‘…..whakapapa (Family ancestry) is a series of never-ending beginnings…” Moana Jackson

Inspiring, uplifting, the ten ethics Moana Jackson presents are a powerful force for change in 2016 and beyond. Made in his speech to He Manawa Whenua Indigenous Research Conference 2013 as below on video, it’s perfect year start to ‘never-ending beginnings.’

It’s a glorious, hot, summer holiday start. We’re not a religious or overly Christmas focused whanau (family). Pressies, Santa  are for the kids, but kai (food) is for everyone!cropped-cricket-xmas-2015.jpg

 

We headed outside, on the lawn, down to the parks and beach for cricket, swimming and then MORE kai (food)!

I had made a half-pie list of all the podcasts, links, articles and books to read that I had wanted to catch up on from 2015 never actually intending to look at any of them!

So I was rapt that upon retreating indoors from the heat that the very first one on my list that I watched,  the brilliant and remarkable Moana Jackson was awesome. His speech is the antidote to all the usual ‘end of year’ palaver that gets put about.

Moana Jackson presents ten ethics as a gift, not a framework, or in any way locked in, for his audience, the indigenous researchers.

  1. The ethic of prior thought
  2. The ethic of moral or right choice
  3. The ethic of imagination
  4. The ethic of change
  5. The ethic of time
  6. The ethic of power
  7. The ethic of courage
  8. The ethic of honesty
  9. The ethic of modesty
  10. the ethic of celebration

These ethics are such a powerful force that we could ALL do with a little bit of transformative change in 2016!

An added bonus is you also get a glimpse via a somewhat lengthy introduction to the legendary Dr Ngahuia Awekōtutku Māori, feminist, takatapuhi (two-spirited) academic and activist. Thanks to, Associate Professor Leonie Pihama, Director of Te Kōtahi Research Institute and her team for recording and ensuring this speech is available on-line for all to share. `

Yes, Moana’s speech is from 2013 and before you say ‘Ngāti Tūreiti!’ (latecomer!) Moana also notes very eloquently here, that rather than making being late or on ‘Māori time’ the negative western notion that it is that as indigenous holders of prior thought (Ethic #1 !!) Māori are to regard time as just like whakapapa(family ancestry),  ‘ a series of never-ending beginnings..

Happy never-ending beginnings to you all!